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Capecitabine (Xeloda) Linked to Potentially Fatal Skin Reactions

Capecitabine (Xeloda) Linked to Potentially Fatal Skin ReactionsCapecitabine (Xeloda), an oral drug used to treat breast and colorectal cancers, has been associated with potentially fatal cutaneous reactions. The drug's manufacturer, Hoffmann-La Roche, reported today in an advisory from Health Canada that severe skin reactions have been observed in patients using capecitabine. In a letter to healthcare professionals, Health Canada noted that "very rare cases of severe cutaneous reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), in some cases with fatal outcome, have been reported during treatment with capecitabine." Associated signs and symptoms of severe skin reactions can include flu-like symptoms, fever, skin itching, and a painful red or purplish skin rash that spreads and blisters and eventually causes the skin to shed. Other possible symptoms include mouth sores, eye burning, itching, and discharge. The manufacturer emphasized that patients using this drug who develop any of these symptoms should contact their healthcare professional immediately. Capecitabine is approved in the United States for the treatment of metastatic colorectal and breast cancer. A generic capecitabine product (Teva Pharmaceuticals) received approvalfrom the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in September. That product currently carries a boxed warning about a potential drug interaction; levels of warfarin in the blood can increase, leading to serious adverse effects. Adverse effects reported with capecitabine include diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, mouth sores, hand–foot syndrome, fever, and infection, according to the FDA.

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